Current Courses – Fall 2021

Check individual program course options and work with your advisor to determine what courses are available for your program.

Undergraduate

  • Course Number: BL 301
  • Department: Biblical Languages
  • Units: 4
  • Level: Undergraduate

An introductory course to Biblical Hebrew. Students will gain a basic understanding of grammar, syntax, and vocabulary. The course focuses on learning and pronouncing the alphabet, vowels, different parts of speech, nouns and verb inflectional forms, and building vocabulary. It provides the necessary foundation for developing skills needed to read, understand, and interpret Classical Hebrew Scriptures. Having the ability to read the Hebrew Bible will enhance knowledge of Hebraic culture, reinforce and further knowledge of other religious disciplines, increase knowledge of student’s own language, enhance personal devotion, serve as a useful tool for the study of other Hebraic texts, and allow for an informed and powerful teaching and preaching ministry.

  • Course Number: BL 303
  • Department: Biblical Languages
  • Units: 4
  • Level: Undergraduate

The goal of Greek I and II is to equip students with a basic working knowledge of the Koine Greek. An understanding of Biblical Greek will be a valuable tool in your personal study of God’s word in your ministry. The course will present an introduction to Koine Greek, with an emphasis on grammar, syntax, and vocabulary as used in the New Testament. Introduction to Biblical Greek is a 2 trimester course. Both trimesters are required to be taken consecutively.

  • Course Number: CH 304
  • Department: Church History
  • Units: 3
  • Level: Undergraduate

Spiritual Outpourings and Revival gives students an overview of the spiritual outpourings and revivals in North America and the world during the 20th Century. The course traces three of the major revivals of the past century. The student will learn about the background, people, places, and events that surrounded these revivals, and discover the continuing impact of these revivals on Christianity. This course uses the study of the past to provide a foundation for the present.

  • Course Number: HU 201
  • Department: Humanities
  • Units: 3
  • Level: Undergraduate

History of Music in the Church will examine how our ancestors of faith in both the Old and New Testaments used music in their worship. We will research how music of the early church would have been adapted to the times of extreme persecution and then evolved after the 4th century when the melodies we call chant were finally collected, codified, and franchised to the churches in the 4th and 5th centuries. We will study the sources of single melody chants in the liturgy of the Mass; trace its evolution into two, three, and even more melodies being sung simultaneously; and look at the beginnings of music notation.  Students will explore the musical diversities created by the Reformation and Counter-Reformation: from the Lutheran Chorales to metrical psalm setting; from the cantatas of Bach to English hymn settings; from the oratorios of Handel to spirituals and revival tunes; and from the organ musings of Olivier Messiaen to the pop/rock influenced praise music of today.  We will also touch on the music used in the churches of the Near East, Russia and Africa. Assigned listening examples corresponding with each week’s readings provide musical context, and, of course, students will learn and employ the vocabulary needed to describe and discuss the Church’s music used throughout the ages.

  • Course Number: HU 211
  • Department: Humanities
  • Units: 3
  • Level: Undergraduate

Reading the Bible gives the student the opportunity to read through the Bible from Genesis to Revelation with minimal focus on doctrine or detailed analysis.  The primary text for this course is the Bible.* However, Ryken’s Bible Handbook by Leland Ryken, Philip Ryken, and James Wilhoit provides background for each of the Bible books and give tips for reading.  Ryken’s Handbook adds the extra dimension to the course that highlights the variety of literary genres used in the scriptures.

  • Course Number: JS 301
  • Department: Jewish Studies
  • Units: 3
  • Level: Undergraduate

Exploring Jewish Prayer, Practices, and Thought is a serious attempt to provide students with a broad understanding and appreciation of Jewish Law, Jewish Prayer, and Jewish Ethics. Using a varied selection of books, the course follows the weekly Torah Readings, enabling participants to experience in real time the Jewish calendar.

  • Course Number: JS 303
  • Department: Jewish Studies
  • Units: 3
  • Level: Undergraduate

Jewish Foundations of Christianity examines an unexplored, misunderstood, yet vital subject. Christianity is deeply rooted in the Jewish religion, culture, and history. The course seeks to enhance participants’ understanding of the emergence and development of Christianity from Judaism; the complex relationship between the two religions, and several major concepts in Jewish heritage that influenced the life of the early church. The course explores the history of Judaism during the Second Temple period, the Abrahamic covenant and its relation to the New Testament and the early church. Major theological conflicts of Jesus and the early church with Judaism, the faith and life of the first Messianic Jews, and Jewish religious celebrations preserved by the church will be discussed as well.

  • Course Number: MM 401
  • Department: Mentored Field Ministry
  • Units: 3
  • Level: Undergraduate

The Mentored Ministry course provides an apprenticeship experience for students to serve in a focused area of ministry. They will interact with a mentor who will direct, encourage and evaluate their activities as they minister in real life situations. This training allows for students to apply what they have learned at the University, and to draw on the principles taught in their biblical, theological, and ministry practices studies. The students will explore and write about the practice of mentoring in the Scriptures. The students will also write a paper that reflects on their mentoring experience, and on what they have learned in their studies.

  • Course Number: MT 305
  • Department: Ministry Studies
  • Units: 3
  • Level: Graduate

Introduction to Biblical Interpretation provides an overview of the historical and cultural background and the literary genres of the Bible as a foundation for the study of Scripture. The student will study the integration of history, literature, and theology to ensure a proper interpretation of the Bible. The student will gain insights into the various genres of Old and New Testament literature and the best guidelines to interpret each type. This course will explore various applications of these truths.

  • Course Number: MT 310
  • Department: Ministry Studies
  • Units: 3
  • Level: Undergraduate

Divine Healing and Miracles will address the history, teachings and accounts, and application of divine healing and miracles found in the Scriptures. The student will explore the workings of these gifts throughout the history of the Church; and examine the purpose, motivation, and process for these divine gifts.

  • Course Number: MT 311
  • Department: Ministry Studies
  • Units: 3
  • Level: Undergraduate

Principles of Spiritual Care provides a biblical Trinitarian foundation for Christian counseling and ministry. It explores the “why” behind the “what” and “how.” This course will explore how the understanding of God as a “being in relations” impacts spiritual care and ministry. This course will develop a theological basis for spiritual care.

  • Course Number: MT 406
  • Department: Ministry Studies
  • Units: 3
  • Level: Undergraduate

Homiletics is a course designed to teach the principles of developing and delivering anointed expository sermons. The practical goal of this course is to familiarize students with the principles involved in each step of developing and delivering an expository message; from prayerfully looking to the Holy Spirit for the initial selection of a text, through the development of a main idea, preparing an outline and draft of the sermon, to the oral delivery of the message God is giving.

  • Course Number: NT 301
  • Department: New Testament
  • Units: 3
  • Level: Undergraduate

Introduction to the New Testament is a study of the background, content, and basic themes presented in the New Testament documents. The purpose is to come to an understanding of the message of the New Testament that will provide a basis for personal growth and an ability to explain the Scriptures to others. The student will become familiar with the main themes of each of the books of the New Testament. In addition, woven into the class is a study of important background issues, theological themes, and critical issues, such as the authorship, dating, and integrity of New Testament documents.

  • Course Number: NT 309
  • Department: New Testament
  • Units: 3
  • Level: Undergraduate

Background of the New Testament will focus on Jewish, Greek, and Roman life – the three major cultures that combine and clash in the New Testament setting. The course will provide the student with a big picture view of the complex world in which the church was born. With this goal in mind, the student will examine the historical, religious, philosophical, political, social, literary, and geographical contexts of the first century.

  • Course Number: NT 310
  • Department: New Testament
  • Units: 3
  • Level: Undergraduate

The Formation of the New Testament is a course that will introduce the student to the literary background of New Testament times, present an understanding of the Bible as the Word of God, and give an overview of the Old and New Testaments and how they fit together as a unified book. The course will cover the various forms of biblical/textual criticism, and the process that took place to choose which books got into the New Testament canon and which ones were rejected. The student will discover how the books of the Bible came together in the form recognized today.

  • Course Number: NT 450
  • Department: New Testament
  • Units: 3
  • Level: Undergraduate

Students in the Bachelor of Arts New Testament Studies Program will integrate their various courses of study by demonstrating the competencies addressed in the program outcomes. They will develop deeper understanding of the writings that make up the New Testament, their message, the historical and cultural backgrounds that they were written in, their Jewish roots, and the worldview by which we live and apply the writings today.

  • Course Number: OT 301
  • Department: Old Testament
  • Units: 3
  • Level: Undergraduate

The course will give an overview of the entire Old Testament, highlighting the authorship, themes, and historical context of each book. Included will be a brief study of the lives of the main men and women of the Old Testament world. This course uses the survey method of study. Here students will not only learn “about” the Old Testament, but also learn “how to study inductively.” Students will be guided through background information and other materials as they are encouraged to discover for themselves each of the Old Testament books.

  • Course Number: PL 401
  • Department: Pastoral Leadership
  • Units: 3
  • Level: Undergraduate

Foundations of Liturgy will cover the practices of a church for public worship. The student will gain a comprehensive view of the scriptural principles involved in Christian liturgical practices historically and today. The course begins with a study of the New Testament Church gatherings. Using Old Testament examples and New Testament teaching, the student will proceed to analyze the basic elements of church gatherings, as well as principles and keys for leading congregants in a service. The student will be provided with practical, Spirit-led guidelines. Students will be coached in simple applications of these principles. These topics are studied primarily via the lens of the Scriptures, the course textbooks, and readings from selected practitioners.

  • Course Number: TH 302
  • Department: Theology
  • Units: 3
  • Level: Undergraduate

Theology 2 presents a thorough introductory study of three core doctrines: 1) the application of redemption, 2) the Church, 3) the future. The student will examine the biblical bases for the doctrines, clarify the position held in the text, and analyze variant understandings of the concepts with measured reason. The student will be able to interpret, explain and appraise these major doctrines. Finally the student will make personal application of their increased understanding of the scriptural doctrines.

Graduate

  • Course Number: BL 501
  • Department: Biblical Languages
  • Units: 4
  • Level: Graduate

An introductory course to Biblical Hebrew. Students will gain a basic understanding of grammar, syntax, and vocabulary. The course focuses on learning and pronouncing the alphabet, vowels, different parts of speech, nouns and verb inflectional forms, and building vocabulary. It provides the necessary foundation for developing skills needed to read, understand, and interpret Classical Hebrew Scriptures. Having the ability to read the Hebrew Bible will enhance knowledge of Hebraic culture, reinforce and further knowledge of other religious disciplines, increase knowledge of student’s own language, enhance personal devotion, serve as a useful tool for the study of other Hebraic texts, and allow for an informed and powerful teaching and preaching ministry.

  • Course Number: BL 503
  • Department: Biblical Languages
  • Units: 4
  • Level: Graduate

The goal of Greek I and II is to equip students with a basic working knowledge of the Koine Greek. An understanding of Biblical Greek will be a valuable tool in your personal study of God’s word in your ministry. The course will present an introduction to Koine Greek, with an emphasis on grammar, syntax, and vocabulary as used in the New Testament. Introduction to Biblical Greek is a 2 trimester course. Both trimesters are required to be taken consecutively.

  • Course Number: CH 504
  • Department: Church History
  • Units: 3
  • Level: Graduate

Spiritual Outpourings and Revival gives students an overview of the spiritual outpourings and revivals in North America and the world during the 20th century. The course traces three of the major revivals of the past century. The student will learn about the background, people, places, and events that surrounded these revivals, and discover the continuing impact of these revivals on Christianity. This course uses the study of the past to provide a foundation for the present.

  • Course Number: GS 501
  • Department: General Studies
  • Units: 3
  • Level: Graduate

Theological Research and Writing will prepare students for research and writing requirements of future Shiloh University course work. It will instruct students in the categories of biblical and theological resources, and how to utilize EndNote in cataloging resources. The students will learn various types and approaches to biblical and theological research, and the process of writing a research paper. The course includes a review of basic grammar in preparation for future studies in the biblical languages and the process of biblical exegesis.

  • Course Number: JS 501
  • Department: Jewish Studies
  • Units: 3
  • Level: Graduate

Exploring Jewish Prayer, Practices, and Thought is a serious attempt to provide students with a broad understanding and appreciation of Jewish Law, Jewish Prayer, and Jewish Ethics. Using a varied selection of books, the course follows the weekly Torah Readings, enabling participants to experience in real time the Jewish calendar.

  • Course Number: JS 503
  • Department: Jewish Studies
  • Units: 3
  • Level: Graduate

Jewish Foundations of Christianity examines an unexplored, misunderstood, yet vital subject. Christianity is deeply rooted in the Jewish religion, culture, and history. The course seeks to enhance participants’ understanding of the emergence and development of Christianity from Judaism; the complex relationship between the two religions, and several major concepts in Jewish heritage that influenced the life of the early church. The course explores the history of Judaism during the Second Temple period, the Abrahamic covenant and its relation to the New Testament and the early church. Major theological conflicts of Jesus and the early church with Judaism, the faith and life of the first Messianic Jews, and Jewish religious celebrations preserved by the church will be discussed as well.

  • Course Number: MM 501
  • Department: Mentored Field Ministry
  • Units: 3
  • Level: Graduate

The Mentored Ministry course provides an apprenticeship experience for students to serve in a focused area of ministry. They will interact with a mentor who will direct, encourage and evaluate their activities as they minister in real life situations. This training allows for students to apply what they have learned at the University, and to draw on the principles taught in their biblical, theological, and ministry practices studies. The students will explore and write about the practice of mentoring in the Scriptures. The students will also write a paper that reflects on their mentoring experience, and on what they have learned in their studies.

  • Course Number: MT 505
  • Department: Ministry Studies
  • Units: 3
  • Level: Graduate

Introduction to Biblical Interpretation provides an overview of the historical and cultural background and the literary genres of the Bible as a foundation for the study of Scripture. The student will study the integration of history, literature, and theology to ensure a proper interpretation of the Bible. The student will gain insights into the various genres of Old and New Testament literature and the best guidelines to interpret each type. This course will explore various applications of these truths.

  • Course Number: MT 506
  • Department: Ministry Studies
  • Units: 3
  • Level: Graduate

Homiletics is a course designed to teach the principles of developing and delivering anointed expository sermons. The practical goal of this course is to familiarize students with the principles involved in each step of developing and delivering an expository message; from prayerfully looking to the Holy Spirit for the initial selection of a text, through the development of a main idea, preparing an outline and draft of the sermon, to the oral delivery of the message God is giving.

  • Course Number: MT 510
  • Department: Ministry Studies
  • Units: 3
  • Level: Graduate

Divine Healing and Miracles will address the history, teachings and accounts, and application of divine healing and miracles found in the Scriptures. The student will explore the workings of these gifts throughout the history of the Church; and examine the purpose, motivation, and process for these divine gifts.

  • Course Number: MT 511
  • Department: Ministry Studies
  • Units: 3
  • Level: Graduate

Principles of Spiritual Care provides a biblical Trinitarian foundation for Christian counseling and ministry. It explores the “why” behind the “what” and “how.” This course will explore how the understanding of God as a “being in relations” impacts spiritual care and ministry. This course will develop a theological basis for spiritual care.

  • Course Number: NT 501
  • Department: New Testament
  • Units: 3
  • Level: Graduate

Introduction to the New Testament is a study of the background, content, and basic themes presented in the New Testament documents. The purpose is to come to an understanding of the message of the New Testament that will provide a basis for personal growth and an ability to explain the Scriptures to others. The student will become familiar with the main themes of each of the books of the New Testament. In addition, woven into the class is a study of important background issues, theological themes, and critical issues, such as the authorship, dating, and integrity of New Testament documents.

  • Course Number: OT 501
  • Department: Old Testament
  • Units: 3
  • Level: Graduate

The course will give an overview of the entire Old Testament, highlighting the authorship, themes, and historical context of each book. Included will be a brief study of the lives of the main men and women of the Old Testament world. This course uses the survey method of study. Here students will not only learn “about” the Old Testament, but also learn “how to study inductively.” Students will be guided through background information and other materials as they are encouraged to discover for themselves each of the Old Testament books.

  • Course Number: OT 520
  • Department: Old Testament
  • Units: 3
  • Level: Graduate

This course is designed to introduce the student to the historical, literary, and theological interpretation of the Pentateuch. Individual assignments and readings will also draw attention to historical questions, hermeneutical challenges, and practical applications.

  • Course Number: PL 501
  • Department: Pastoral Leadership
  • Units: 3
  • Level: Graduate

Foundations of Liturgy will cover the practices of a church for public worship. The student will gain a comprehensive view of the scriptural principles involved in Christian liturgical practices historically and today. The course begins with a study of the New Testament Church gatherings. Using Old Testament examples and New Testament teaching, the student will proceed to analyze the basic elements of church gatherings, as well as principles and keys for leading congregants in a service. The student will be provided with practical, Spirit-led guidelines. Students will be coached in simple applications of these principles. These topics are studied primarily via the lens of the Scriptures, the course textbooks, and readings from selected practitioners.

  • Course Number: TH 502
  • Department: Theology
  • Units: 3
  • Level: Graduate

Theology 2 presents a thorough introductory study of three core doctrines: 1) the application of redemption, 2) the Church, 3) the future. The student will examine the biblical bases for the doctrines, clarify the position held in the text, and analyze variant understandings of the concepts with measured reason. The student will be able to interpret, explain and appraise these major doctrines. Finally the student will make personal application of their increased understanding of the scriptural doctrines.

Doctoral

  • Course Number: DM 701
  • Department: Doctoral
  • Units: 3
  • Level: Doctoral

Identity Formation examines the Pastor/Leader’s personal life with perspectives on congregation and ministry formation and provides a foundation for the Doctor of Ministry program. Participants explore the importance of ministerial identity, receive assistance in formulating a viable theology of charismatic ministry, and receive a comprehensive orientation to Shiloh University, and the Doctor of Ministry program.

  • Course Number: DM 721
  • Department: Doctoral
  • Units: 3
  • Level: Doctoral

The American Church in Crisis examines the nature of the American Church in crisis and works to address it. This seminar seeks to observe and analyze this crisis as it is evidenced in the massive attendance declines observable across today’s movements and traditions. It explores the thematic relationship between the Exile of Ancient Israel and Late-modernity’s present church crisis; and seeks to ask and answer the question: “Is God involved in this decline? If so, how is He involved and to what end?” Using the Exile as practical theological paradigm, participants will develop a Philosophy of Ministry to effectively address the crisis as it may occur in their local context.

  • Course Number: DM 756
  • Department: Doctoral
  • Units: 3
  • Level: Doctoral

Creative Conflict Management is a strategic offering in creative conflict management. It focuses upon the complexity of conflict within the community of faith, and addresses the approaches and methods useful in managing and resolving conflict. The participant will learn how to approach conflict as an opportunity for growth.

  • Course Number: DM 791
  • Department: Doctoral
  • Units: 3
  • Level: Doctoral

Research Clinic 1 is conducted at the start of the first year of the Doctor of Ministry experience. It provides instruction for researching and writing of the Professional Ministry Research Project. The pre-research clinic involves preparation for the submitting of a Concept Paper for project committee evaluation. Later, in DM792, this Concept Paper will be expanded into a Project Proposal. During the clinic, the Concept Paper is offered to the peer group for input and evaluation. Pre-research clinic includes instruction in project development, applied research methods, and project proposal writing.

  • Course Number: DM 796
  • Department: Doctoral
  • Units: 3
  • Level: Doctoral

Based on an approved project proposal, the candidate will research and write a ministry project that relates to a significant aspect of the ministry in which he/she is involved. Ministry Research Project is a one-year seminar with set milestones for timely completion of the project. Regular cohort discussions and faculty interaction is included during the participant’s research project work. To earn credit the candidate must complete a successful oral defense. The candidate is assigned an individual faculty advisor for the project.